Dr. Harvey Receives John Hope Franklin Award

WASHINGTON (March 12, 2018) – Hampton University President Dr. William R. Harvey received the prestigious John Hope Franklin Award, recognizing his outstanding achievements in higher education, March 12 at the 100th national meeting of the American Council of Education in Washington, D.C.


The award, presented by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine, is named in memory of Dr. Franklin’s scholarly contributions to the nation on an ongoing basis. Past award recipients include Dr. Clifton Wharton, Bill and Melinda Gates, Dr. Maya Angelou and legendary civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.).  Dr. Harvey knew and respected Dr. Franklin.


In his acceptance remarks, Dr. Harvey said, “I was privileged to know this giant of a man on a personal basis starting in 1970 when he was chairman of the board of trustees at Fisk University and I was assistant to the president. His honesty, integrity, intellect, courage in the face of adversity, dignity and demonstrated respect for others had a lasting effect on me.” Harvey said. “An award carrying such a name as Franklin’s is one to be admired and celebrated. I am honored and humbled to be in the company of John Hope Franklin Award winners.”


For nearly 40 years, Dr. Harvey has served Hampton University with dignity and created a monumental legacy. He is among the longest sitting college or university presidents in the United States.


Diverse is a publication that focuses on the role of and issues pertaining to underrepresented groups in higher education. Originally titled “Black Issues in Higher Education,” the magazine converted to its current title in 2005 to reflect the inclusivity of America’s changing demographics. Diverse is considered the premier source of timely news, commentary, interviews and special reports on diversity in higher education. The publication addresses issues that not only affect African-Americans, but Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, people with disabilities, seniors, veterans and other underrepresented groups in higher education.